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Not letting someone observe the dietary or dress customs of their faith, using racial slurs, threatening to ‘out’ someone as LGBQ/T if their friends and family don’t know, or isolating someone who doesn’t speak the dominant language where they live – all of these are examples of cultural abuse.

An abusive relationship can include any or all of these types of behaviors, sustained over a period of time and often escalating.

Technological Abuse is the use of technologies such as texting and social networking to bully, harass, stalk or intimidate a partner.

Often this behavior is a form of verbal or emotional abuse perpetrated online.

It’s important to note that physical force is one means of power and control and it is far from the only one. Below are six different types of abuse we discuss in our training with new volunteers or employees. Physical This is the type of abuse that many people think of when they hear the word ‘abuse.’ It can include punching, hitting, slapping, kicking, strangling, or physically restraining a partner against their will.

It can also include driving recklessly or invading someone’s physical space, and in any other way making someone feel physically unsafe. Sexual While sexual abuse can be a form of physical abuse, we put it in a category by itself because it can include both physical and non-physical components.

It wasn’t until 1993 that marital rape was illegal in all 50 states, so some people may still assume that sex is something a partner is entitled to, and not recognize it as a larger pattern of power and control. Verbal/Emotional As one survivor puts it, “My ex-husband used words like weapons; like shards of glass, cutting and slowly draining my life, until I had nearly none left.

The result of this, especially over a sustained period of time – and often with the isolation that abusers also tend to use – is that the victim depends on the abuser more and more because they don’t trust their own judgment.

They also hesitate to tell anyone about the abuse they’re experiencing, for fear they won’t be believed.

Dating violence is violence that occurs within a dating relationship rather than, say, marriage; and dating violence is as much a problem for teenagers as it is for adults.

In fact, statistics show that one-in-three teenagers have experienced teenage domestic violence in a dating relationship.